The Mannerly Dog
A Mannerly Dog is Easy to Love
Pasadena, Texas
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Training Articles
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Nancy M. Kelly, B.S., CPDT-KA
Certified Professional Dog Trainer
Behavior Consultant
Pasadena, Texas


Housetraining Your Dog
Whether you have a dog or a puppy, it’s important to create a program that you are committed to in order to housetrain him quickly and completely.

How To Teach A Dog Not To Jump Up On People
​If a dog is sitting, he's not jumping up. Teach a dog an alternative to jumping up on people like "Sit to Greet People," and he'll do it!

Be Prepared for Behavior Emergencies: Loose Dog Approaching!
This article describes the development and use of an emergency U-turn with your dog.

Teach the Foundations of Good Dog Behavior
Why is training important? What’s most important to teach your dog and why? How can the basic behaviors we teach our dogs help us in real-life situations?
Start at the Beginning
Dogs can learn so much if we help them understand what we’re trying to teach them. Advanced training really starts with the details.

No Free Feeding
Control the food and you control the dog. Control is not about being mean, but about being practical.

Poisoned Cue in Progress
A story about how our inconsistencies in training can create confusion and conflict for our dogs.

Puppy Development Stages
An outline and description of the very short stages in your puppy’s mental, emotional, and behavior development process; how important it is to teach your puppy what he’s ready to learn within each of these fast-changing stages.

Trading Protocol
Prevention and Treatment of Resource Guarding Issues in Dogs:
Read this if your dog guards his food, toys, or anything else. Read it for sure if you have a puppy or a new dog, and practice the exercises as a preventive for guarding behavior!

Shy Fearful Dogs
Handling Shy or Fearful Dogs to Help Them Build Confidence:
So many dogs are afraid of people! We can talk all day about what causes it, but helping them build confidence is required immediately. We humans must focus on what they want and use it to get them to try new things, like taking a step toward us of their own choice. Sometimes that’s all a fearful dog can do at first. Using the techniques in this article will help you modify their behavior, creating more confidence and development in the right direction.

How to Teach Animals by B.F. Skinner
Want to know how to train a dog? Here’s an article published by B.F. Skinner himself in 1951 that tells you exactly what to do. The challenge we humans have is truly our reluctance to change our behavior, or our desire to do the same thing over and over and hope for different results. This article tells you just how to apply the behavior principles to change your dog’s behavior. We humans often need coaching from a professional dog trainer to help us develop the skills we need, but it can be done at home! DO try this at home – but feel free to contact The Mannerly Dog for guidance and coaching.



Lots of Dogs in One Place!

Fostering Dogs
How bringing a new dog into your home affects everyone else living there and how to help everyone feel like their home is not being invaded by a stranger.

Introducing Dogs
Whether you are having a visitor who is bringing a dog or you're bringing an additional dog into your life, you will need to facilitate proper introductions. Some dogs will be best friends quickly, others will take some time to de-stress and get to know each other; a few dog pairs will never like each other. Following a series of introduction techniques will help the dogs succeed.

The Mysteries of Multi-dog Households: Effects on Dog Behavior
Living with more than one dog, even temporarily, takes focus.
Exercises to Help Reactive Dogs
The opposite of reactivity is calm and thinking clearly; exercises for reactive dogs help with everything from "out of control because he's so excited" to "growls and lunges at other dogs on leash."

Teaching Reactive Dogs a New Habit, Part 1
This article describes the use of the "Open Bar" technique.

Teaching Reactive Dogs a New Habit, Part 2
This article describes the use of the "Look at That!" exercise.